Could the Cavoodle be the perfect match for you?

by PetCloud / Pet Owner Advice / 29 May 2020

Cavoodle

If you’re looking for a furry friend that’s both outgoing and highly intelligent as well as super cute - the Cavoodle might just be the one for you! Everything you need to know about one of Australia's favourite breeds. 

Breed Snapshot

  • Size Small Dog (5-10kg) 
  • Coat Low shedding, but trips to the Groomer are required every 8 weeks at a cost of around $70
  • Energy Best walked daily for 1 hour in the cool of the morning or afternoon.
  • Lifespan  13 – 15 years
  • Country of origin  Australia and USA
  • Breed type  offspring of a Poodle and a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. 
  • Temperament: intelligent, affectionate, playful and love people. They are very trainable, obedient and are easy to teach
  • Other names  ‘Cavapoo’ is the USA name.
  • Great breed for: 
    • Apartment living or homes with a yard
    • Families with kids

What is a Cavoodle dog? 
One of Australia’s most popular breeds, the Cavoodle, also known as the Cavapoo is a mix between a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and a Poodle.  They became popular in the late 1990s through cross breeding programmes in Australia and have since become a fan favourite.  The Cavoodle was bred to inherit the laid-back nature of the Cavalier King Charles and the loyalty and intelligence of the Poodle, making them the perfect companion. They’re a very social breed, making great family pets as well as getting along well with other dogs.

What do Cavoodles look like?
In terms of what your Cavoodle puppy may look like as it grows up; they can vary in size between that of a Cavalier King Charles – weighing between six to nine kg and standing roughly 30-33 cm. Or the Poodle, which will depend on the breed of Poodle used to parent, as both Toy Poodles and Miniature Poodles are used in breeding. The Toy Poodle, on average stands around 25 cm tall and weighs up to four and a half kg, whereas the Miniature Poodle is slightly larger, standing at 25-38 cm and weighing five to eight kg. This means your Cavoodle will stand between 25-38cm and weigh between 5-12kg, depending on its parents.  They can also vary in colour being either gold, tan, cream, black or brown and may have markings in these colours too!

What makes the Cavoodle special?

Something that sets them apart from other small dog breeds is their hypoallergenic fur. They were bred to shed little to no fur, meaning the allergy-causing dander that sticks to dog fur doesn’t get released into the air and irritate those with allergies such as hay fever or asthma.  They have also been known to make great school and therapy dogs! For example, schools like Campell House School in NSW have their very own Cavoodle therapy dog called Bear, providing emotional support for the students. There are many benefits to having therapy dogs such as reducing anxiety and lifting mood, tactile stimulation and developing ability to form bonds. The friendly and loving temperament of Cavoodles means they are the perfect companions!

How often do I need to groom my Cavoodle?

To keep their beachy waves in top form, the Cavoodle needs to be groomed regularly to avoid tangling. It’s recommended that they’re brushed every week and taken to be clipped every four to six weeks.  Cavoodles are considered to be moderate to high maintenance when it comes to their grooming. Pet Cloud offers grooming and clipping services from $60 to help keep your doggo tidy. Just follow the link to post a job and find the perfect groomer for you!

How often should I walk my Cavoodle?

Cavoodles are a very active breed with heaps of energy so they’re well suited to an active household! They need around 30-60 minutes exercise a day and lots of play space at home. Due to their high intelligence, they love mentally stimulating toys to keep them busy and use up some of that energy!

How do I train my Cavoodle?

Cavoodles are highly intelligent and with the right training, your dog can learn some pretty impressive party tricks! The best approach to Cavoodle training is with gentle guidance rather than strong discipline. They respond well to positive reinforcement – if they’re doing well, let them know with lots of praise and some treats! The key is to remain positive; try to match their excitement with enthusiasm and praise!
 
Training sessions should be kept short, fun and often – this is the best way to hold your dog’s attention and get the most out of their training. Pet Cloud offers dog training classes in blocks of six-week, one-hour sessions with registered trainers. The trainer will come to your home and use positive reinforcement techniques. 

 


Quickfire Cavoodle Questions

How long will my Cavoodle live?

The typical lifespan of a Cavoodle is around 13-15 years.
 

Can my Cavoodle be left alone during the day?


Although Cavoodles are very sociable and love attention- with the right training, your dog can become comfortable being alone whilst you go to work. Or you can book a doggy day care program if you prefer. 
 

Are Cavoodles ‘barkers’?


As a naturally social breed, Cavoodles may bark a lot, but this is an issue that can easily be overcome with training. 
 

What kind of health risks do Cavoodles face?


As a mixed breed, Cavoodles are less prone to developing genetic disorders and are in the ‘low risk’ category for health problems. However, as with all breeds, there are some issues they are more likely to face such as luxating patella (sliding knee caps) and cataracts in later life. 
 

Where can I get a Cavoodle?


So after learning all about the Cavoodle, you’ve decided it’s time to welcome one into your family? Great! There are several things to consider, such as the option to adopt rather than buy one from a breeder. Adoption is a great way to offer a pet the loving home they deserve. Be sure to check out the RSPCA’s adoption guide to find out more. 

If you’re wanting to buy your Cavoodle from a breeder, be sure to do your research to make sure they’re responsible and you’re not supporting a puppy farm. The RSPCA also has a handy guide for finding the right breeder.

 

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